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Article
August 1982

C2 Deficient Systemic Lupus ErythematosusIts Association With Anti-Ro (SSA) Antibodies

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Dermatology, the Fargo Clinic and the Division of Dermatology, University of North Dakota (Fargo) Medical School (Dr Vandersteen); the Department of Dermatology, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore (Dr Provost); the Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, The Medical College of Wisconsin (Milwaukee) (Dr Jordon); and the Rheumatology Research Laboratory, the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn (Dr McDuffie). Dr McDuffie is currently at the National Office of the Arithritis Foundation, Atlanta.

Arch Dermatol. 1982;118(8):584-587. doi:10.1001/archderm.1982.01650200052016
Abstract

• C2 deficiency is the most common complement component deficiency. While individuals with C2 deficiency may be completely normal, a lupus erythematosus—like disease process has developed in some. A 28-year-old woman had a chronic photodermatitis, arthralgias, and mesangial lupus nephritis. She has C2 deficiency associated with an HLA-Dw2 transplantation antigen. Her serum has shown antibodies to the macromolecule Ro (the A antigen in Sjögren's syndrome), while failing to demonstrate antinuclear antibodies in routine laboratory determinations.

(Arch Dermatol 1982;118:584-587)

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