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Article
April 1984

Allergy to Yellow Dyes

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Medicine, Division of Dermatology, UCLA School of Medicine Center for the Health Sciences, Los Angeles.

Arch Dermatol. 1984;120(4):535-536. doi:10.1001/archderm.1984.01650400117025
Abstract

Quinazaline yellow SS (DC Yellow 11), a quinoline chemical, has elicited interest because of a potential for sensitization.1-4 This is a Food and Drug Administrationapproved dye that is widely used in cosmetics. However, DC Yellow 10, a closely related quinoline chemical, is more widely used in cosmetics and topical preparations, and there has been some concern about possible cross-sensitization between these two drugs.

Recently, Noster and Hausen5 reported one case of occupational allergic contact dermatitis due to DC Yellow 11 that was present in colored smoke used in a detonator. The authors attempted sensitization experiments on guinea pigs but were unsuccessful. Björkner and Magnusson,6 studying DC Yellow 11 in 1981, commented on its use in spirit, lacquers, polystyrenes, polycarbonates, polyamides, acrylic resins, cosmetics, colored smokes, and hydrocarbon solvents. They patch tested 88 subjects with a 1% preparation in polyethylene glycol. They found four positive patch test responses

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