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Article
August 1984

Etretinate Therapy-Reply

Author Affiliations

Brown University Medical School Department of Medicine Roger Williams General Hospital 825 Chalkstone Ave Providence, RI 02908

Arch Dermatol. 1984;120(8):993-994. doi:10.1001/archderm.1984.01650440023009
Abstract

In Reply.—  Baran's experience with etretinate in 96 patients is certainly impressive.1 However, his results create more doubts than they dispel. First of all, our letter refers only to nail psoriasis. In his article he stated that he treated no less than 15 different conditions, a rather haphazard melange of subjects. Furthermore, only five of the cases referred to had dystrophic nails; of those five cases, two cases did not even involve psoriasis. Even his reference to occasional pitting ("parfois d'erosions ponctuees") hardly qualifies as scientific data. In his letter, he states that 55 of his cases showed a "severe reduction in the rate of nail growth." Yet his paper makes no mention of how the rate of growth was ascertained, if indeed it was measured at all. Our patients did not appear to exhibit growth retardation. However, this conclusion is based only on clinical observation and not accurate

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