[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.159.202.12. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
September 1984

Allergic Contact Dermatitis From Anaerobic Acrylic Sealants

Author Affiliations

From the Departments of Dermatology, University of California Medical Center, San Francisco (Drs Mathias and Maibach), and the Department of Medicine, San Francisco General Medical Center (Dr Mathias).

Arch Dermatol. 1984;120(9):1202-1205. doi:10.1001/archderm.1984.01650450084025
Abstract

• Three patients employed in electronic assembly operations had allergic contact dermatitis to polyethylene glycol (PEG) dimethacrylate, found in an anaerobic sealant. Clinical features in all three cases consisted of eczema localized predominantly on the distal parts of the fingers and the palmar aspects of fingertips; onycholysis developed in one patient. No cross reactions to methyl methacrylate were observed on patch testing. Guinea pig maximization testing with both the commercially available sealant and the active resin demonstrated that PEG dimethacrylate is a moderate skin sensitizer.

(Arch Dermatol 1984;120:1202-1205)

×