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Article
March 1986

Intralesional Recombinant Alpha-2 Interferon for the Treatment of Patients With Condyloma Acuminatum or Verruca Plantaris

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Dermatology, University of Minnesota Hospitals, Minneapolis (Drs Vance and Bart); the Department of Dermatology, University of Arizona, Tucson (Dr Hansen); the Infectious Disease Unit, University of Rochester (NY) School of Medicine (Dr Reichman); the Department of Dermatology, Tulane University Medical Center, New Orleans (Dr McEwen); the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Alabama, Birmingham (Dr Hatch); the Department of Dermatology, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York (Dr Berman); and Schering Corporation, Kenilworth, NJ (Dr Tanner). Dr Berman is now with the University of California-Davis.

Arch Dermatol. 1986;122(3):272-277. doi:10.1001/archderm.1986.01660150050014
Abstract

• We conducted a multicenter double-blind study comparing human recombinant intralesional alpha-2 interferon (IFN) and placebo in 237 patients with the clinical diagnosis of condyloma acuminatum or verruca plantaris. A single wart on each patient was injected with 0.1 mL containing 106 IU of IFN, 105 IU of IFN, or placebo three times weekly for three weeks, and the response to treatment was followed up for 12 weeks. Among 91 of the 114 patients with condyloma acuminatum who completed the study, complete clearing of the treated wart occurred in 16 (53%) of 30 patients receiving 106 IU of IFN compared with six (19%) of 32 receiving 105 IU of IFN and four (14%) of 29 receiving placebo. In the group of 100 patients with plantar warts, there was no apparent benefit associated with interferon administration. Seven patients (3%) had treatment discontinued due to adverse reactions. Intralesional alpha-2 IFN is of benefit in the treatment of a single condyloma; its role in the treatment of multiple lesions remains to be clarified. Its role in the treatment of verruca plantaris, where no response was seen, also remains to be clarified.

(Arch Dermatol 1986;122:272-277)

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