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Article
April 1986

Pediculicides and Ovicides

Author Affiliations

Vice-President and Director Research and Development Reed & Carnrick Pharmaceuticals 1 New England Ave Piscataway, NJ 08854

Arch Dermatol. 1986;122(4):373. doi:10.1001/archderm.1986.01660160023002
Abstract

To the Editor.—  A detailed evaluation of the relative pediculicidal and ovicidal activity of six marketed products was presented in the March 1986 Archives.1 The study, which is an attempt to develop a standardized in vitro method of screening for pediculicidal and ovicidal activity, points out the many difficulties involved. However, the approach used by Mienking and co-workers in evaluating pediculicidal activity does not, I believe, provide a closer resemblance to natural conditions than the more commonly used method of dipping lice into the test solution for specified times followed by a water rinse. Their method does not provide coverage of the entire louse as occurs when a pediculicide lotion or shampoo is applied to a person's head. Their finding of 100% effectiveness can be attributed to the fact that they only studied potent chemicals. On the other hand, this method might be an efficient way of screening out

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