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Article
May 1987

Antidepressant Drugs in DermatologyAn Update

Author Affiliations

From the Departments of Psychiatry (Dr M. Gupta) and Dermatology (Drs A. Gupta and Ellis), University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor; the Dermatology Service, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Mich (Dr Ellis); and the Psychodermatology Clinic, Department of Psychiatry, Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto (Dr M. Gupta).

Arch Dermatol. 1987;123(5):647-652. doi:10.1001/archderm.1987.01660290115028
Abstract

• Recent studies indicate that antidepressant medications may be effective treatments for dermatologic disorders such as chronic urticaria and angioedema, nocturnal pruritus in atopic eczema, and postherpetic neuralgia, even in the absence of coexisting psychopathologic conditions. Their efficacy may be related to their antihistaminic, anticholinergic, and centrally mediated analgesic effects and appears to be independent of their antidepressant effect. It is likely, therefore, that more dermatologists will be prescribing these drugs without a psychiatric consultation.

(Arch Dermatol 1987;113:647-652)

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