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Article
July 1988

Pruritus in PsoriasisA Prospective Study of Some Psychiatric and Dermatologic Correlates

Author Affiliations

From the Departments of Psychiatry (Dr M. Gupta and Mr Weiner and Ms Mace), Dermatology (Drs A. Gupta, Ellis, and Voorhees, and Ms Kirkby), and Medicine (Dr Johnson and Mr Schork), University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor.

Arch Dermatol. 1988;124(7):1052-1057. doi:10.1001/archderm.1988.01670070040016
Abstract

† Among 82 inpatients with psoriasis, 67% (55 patients) reported moderate or severe pruritus. The degree of depressive psychopathology discriminated between the mild, moderate, and severe pruritus groups at admission. Prospectively, the change in depression scores correlated with the change in pruritus pretreatment to posttreatment. Pruritus severity did not correlate significantly with stress due to life events, age at onset, ethyl duration of psoriasis, age, sex, marital status, and average reported daily alcohol (ethanol) consumption. Among the objective dermatologic measures, including extent and severity of lesions, only the degree of perilesional irritation discriminated between the mild, moderate, and severe pruritus groups at admission, and prospectively, change in this measure correlated with the change in pruritus pretreatment to posttreatment. This finding was most likely related to the self-excoriation associated with pruritus. Intrapsychic factors (eg, the severity of depression) rather than external psychosocial or well-defined dermatologic factors, were the most significant correlates of pruritus in psoriasis.

(Arch Dermatol 1988;124:1052-1057)

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