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Article
October 1988

Occupational Skin Diseases, United StatesResults From the Bureau of Labor Statistics Annual Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses, 1973 Through 1984

Author Affiliations

From the Industrywide Studies Branch (Dr Mathias) and the Surveillance Branch (Mr Morrison), Division of Hazard Evaluations and Field Studies, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control, Cincinnati.

Arch Dermatol. 1988;124(10):1519-1524. doi:10.1001/archderm.1988.01670100021006
Abstract

• The overall incidence rates, numbers, and proportions of occupational skin diseases recorded in the Bureau of Labor Statistics Annual Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses, from 1973 through 1984, were reviewed, and a detailed analysis of occupational skin diseases recorded in the 1984 Annual Survey was performed. Overall incidence rates and numbers of cases declined from 1973 through 1983, but increased slightly in 1984. The major industrial divisions of agriculture and manufacturing have consistently had the highest rates and numbers of cases, respectively; skin diseases have accounted for almost two thirds of all occupational illnesses within agriculture. In the 1984 Annual Survey, 11 industries were ranked in the "Top 15" for both incidence rates and numbers of cases, at the two-digit Standard Industrial Classification level. At the four-digit level for manufacturing, four industries were also ranked in the "Top 15" for both indexes. This analysis has identified industries toward which research efforts should be directed to characterize those occupational activities or exposures most responsible for these higher risks.

(Arch Dermatol 1988;124:1519-1524)

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