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Article
May 1990

Pruritus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

Author Affiliations

Department of Dermatology, 4M70 San Francisco General Hospital 1001 Potrero Ave San Francisco, CA 94110

Arch Dermatol. 1990;126(5):684-685. doi:10.1001/archderm.1990.01670290132029
Abstract

To the Editor.—  Cutaneous infections by Staphylococcus aureus are frequent in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, and may be pruritic.1 We have identified two patients who were HIV seropositive, with the following features: (1) adult-onset chronic pruritic eczematous dermatitis, temporarily related to infection with HIV; (2) S aureus-positive cultures of nares and skin; (3) peripheral eosinophilia; (4) extremely elevated serum IgE concentrations; (5) no history of atopy; and (6) dramatic response of pruritus and eczema to antistaphylococcal antibiotics.

Report of Cases.—Case 1.—  A 45-year-old man with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related complex, presented with a pruritic eczematous dermatitis of 2 years' duration. He had generalized follicular pustules, excoriated papules, and widespread eczematous, scaly plaques. Initially the dermatitis was accentuated on the dorsa of the hands. Nares and skin cultures were positive for S aureus. Results of laboratory tests disclosed the following values: white blood cell count, 5.2 ×

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