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Article
July 1990

A REMARKABLE CASE OF XANTHELASMAVisiting Dermatologist to the Randall's Island Hospitals, New York City

Arch Dermatol. 1990;126(7):886. doi:10.1001/archderm.1990.01670310046006
Abstract

Xanthelasma is not so rare a disease that an ordinary case of it would be worth reporting. The case that is here detailed merits notice for two reasons: 1. On account of the extraordinary distribution of the lesions. 2. On account of the early age at which the disease began.

Michael M., aged five years, was admitted to my service at Randall's Island in May, 1890. He was sent into the hospital by the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, having been taken by them from his parents in a half-starved condition. From the child's sister I have been able to gather the following imperfect history: The eruption appeared when the child was three months old, without any antecedent disease, and came out all over at the same time. It is thought that no new lesions have appeared since then; that there has been no change in the size of the lesions, and that some of them have disappeared. The boy is said to have always been well, to have played about like other boys, and never to have been jaundiced. The sister denies the allegation of the society that the boy has been starved, and says that he always was thin.

Examination of the boy reveals a very extraordinary condition of affairs—one that will be better understood by reference to the accompanying chromo-lithograph than by any word picture I can give.

J Cutan Genito-Urin Dis.

July 1890;8:20.

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