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Article
October 1992

THE USE OF IODINE, CARBOLIC ACID AND CHLORAL IN DERMATOLOGY

Author Affiliations

Professor of Dermatology, University of Vermont

Arch Dermatol. 1992;128(10):1428. doi:10.1001/archderm.1992.01680200140040
Abstract

The use of iodine, carbolic acid and chloral in dermatology is, I know, nothing new, for either alone or in combination with other agents they have been recommended in many diseases of the skin, and are used with benefit. Thus, iodine was strongly recommended by Hebra in lupus, lentigo and chloasma, and in small-pox to prevent pitting, while as a remedy for erysipelas and ringworm it has been used for many years.

Perhaps there is no other drug which enters more frequently into prescriptions for diseases of the skin than carbolic acid, although after closely studying the literature on the subject I find it very infrequently used in its pure state unless to ulcerated surfaces, lupus and condylomata; but in combination with other substances, thus reducing its strength, it is very frequently used in the parasitic skin affections, chronic eczema, pruritus, and in fact, nearly all the diseases of the skin in which itching is a marked characteristic, for the purpose of relieving this troublesome symptom.

J Cutan Genito-Urin Dis.

October 1892;10:380, 383.

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