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Article
March 1993

Clinical Pharmacology

Author Affiliations

Department of Dermatology Beth Israel Hospital 330 Brookline Ave Boston, MA 02215

Arch Dermatol. 1993;129(3):347. doi:10.1001/archderm.1993.01680240087013
Abstract

To what sources should the clinician turn to learn, relearn, or consult for information about the medically accepted indications for the drugs that he or she might use? Is there a convenient user-friendly source of information about the pharmacology of drugs that focuses on aspects of greatest interest to the clinician? What precautions are important to consider in prescribing a drug and what side effects deserve the clinician's greatest attention? What should the prescriber know about the patient and what should the patient know about the medication that has been prescribed if the use of that drug is to be optimized? What is the recommended dosage for an unlabeled indication? What dosage forms are available?

These topics represent much, but not all the information a clinician needs to know or have readily available when considering the prescription of a medicine. The Physician's Desk Reference (PDR) covers all these topics but is restricted to reprinting the US Food and

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