[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.211.82.105. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 1996

Verruga

Arch Dermatol. 1996;132(2):139. doi:10.1001/archderm.1996.03890260039006
Abstract

which is called now Carrion malady, is endemic, and peculiar to Peru, where probably the Incas have known it.

In order to dissipate the doubts on the question whether the verruga was infectious and inoculable, Daniel A. Carrion, a student of the sixth year, presented himself to an inoculation, which was practiced on him the 27th of August, 1885.... Until the 17th of September he felt nothing; on that day he felt during the evening a light malaise, and a pain in the left tibio-tarsal articulation; the next day the body collapsed.

The patient continued in these conditions until the 24th, when he appeared a little relieved as to all these symptoms. Afterward sweatings presented themselves, pains in the eyes and in the articulations, considerable pallor of the skin and mucous membranes, pulse feeble and frequent, faint and soft murmur at the base of the heart (with the first sound), respiration normal, anorexia, great feebleness, profound and intermittent pain in the right hypochondrium, swelling of liver, vomiting, vertigo, eyes dark-ringed, haggard face, cheeks and temples entirely sunken, discolored mucosa, urine scanty and desire to urinate frequent, loss of memory, on some occasions extreme agitation, pain in the epigastrium and in the precordial and sacral regions. The patient continued thus until October 3d. The morning of that day he declared that he felt better, but his state was the following: Sleeplessness, voice difficult, slow, and sometimes extinguished, respiration irregular, skin dry and cold, picking at the bedclothes and bowel incontinence, incontinence of urine, which is abundant_The 5th, at nine o'clock in the evening, the patient went into coma; the pupils dilated, pulse threadlike and hardly perceptible; tracheal râle. At 11.15 he expired.

M. Alcedan, to whom we are indebted for all these details, proposed, at a public demonstration in honor of this noble victim of the love of science, to give to the verruga the name of Carrion disease.

J Cutan Genito-Urin Dis.

February 1896;14:53-62.

×