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Article
February 1996

Large Congenital Melanocytic Nevi and the Risk for the Development of Malignant MelanomaA Prospective Study

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Dermatology, State University of New York at Stony Brook (Dr Marghoob); and the Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology, New York University School of Medicine (Ms Schoenbach, Drs Kopf, Orlow, and Bart, and Mr Nossa), the Oncology Section, Charles C. Harris Skin and Cancer Pavilion, New York University Medical Center (Drs Kopf and Bart), and the New York University Melanoma Cooperative Group (Dr Kopf), New York.

Arch Dermatol. 1996;132(2):170-175. doi:10.1001/archderm.1996.03890260072011
Abstract

Background and Design:  Patients with large congenital melanocytic nevi have been described to have an increased risk for the development of malignant melanoma (MM). Ninety-two patients with large congenital melanocytic nevi were followed up prospectively for the development of MM. Matched individuals from the general population served as control subjects.

Results:  Ninety-two patients (median age, 3 years) were followed up prospectively for an average of 5.4 years. In three patients (3%), MM developed in extracutaneous sites. The cumulative 5-year life-table risk for the development of MM was calculated to be 4.5% (95% confidence interval, 0% to 9.3%). In individuals in the general US population, matched for age, sex, and length of follow-up to the 92 study patients, 0.013 would be expected to develop MM. The standardized morbidity ratio (adjusted relative risk) was calculated to be 239, which was highly significant (P<.001).

Conclusions:  Patients with large congenital melanocytic nevi are at a significantly increased risk for the development of MM and should be kept under continuous surveillance for the development of cutaneous as well as noncutaneous primary MM.(Arch Dermatol. 1996;132:170-175)

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