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Article
February 1997

Fear, Loathing, Dermatology, and Telemedicine

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Dermatology and Biomedicine Information Communication Center, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland.

Arch Dermatol. 1997;133(2):151-155. doi:10.1001/archderm.1997.03890380021003
Abstract

Change is not necessarily progress. Few physicians—and still fewer specialists— would characterize the wrenching changes occurring in health care over the past decade as progress. When is the last time you heard about a change in the provision of health care that gave providers more time, made practice more profitable, reduced paperwork, or made your life generally easier? Still thinking? So am I. Bad news of one sort or another has come in an unbroken stream for years now, or at least it seems that way. Payments to providers are continually reduced. Managed care has steadily reduced specialists' access to patients. The paperwork associated with referrals, billing, and laboratories continues to mount for most of us.

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