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Article
June 1997

Palpable Migratory Arciform ErythemaClinical Morphology, Histopathology, Immunohistochemistry, and Response to Treatment

Author Affiliations

From the Departments of Dermatology, Universität-Krankenhaus Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany (Drs Abeck, Steinkraus, and Ring) and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich, Germany (Drs Ollert, Eckert, Szeimies, and Braun-Falco), and the Institute of Hematopathology, Kiel, Germany (Dr Tiemann).

Arch Dermatol. 1997;133(6):763-766. doi:10.1001/archderm.1997.03890420103014
Abstract

Background:  Palpable migratory arciform erythema is clinically characterized by sharply circumscribed, infiltrated erythematous patches that tend to spread irregularly, resulting in arciform morphologic features. The histopathologic features are characterized by a patchy inflammatory perivascular and periadnexal T-lym-phocytic infiltrate throughout the dermis. The disease runs a chronic course and is rarely described in the literature.

Observation:  Three middle-aged patients of both sexes had palpable migratory arciform erythema with 1, several, or multiple lesions on the trunk. There was a dense perivascular and periadnexal, predominantly lymphocytic infiltrate of the reticular dermis without any interstitial distribution of inflammatory cells. Absence of mucin deposits and plasma cells was a striking feature. The immunohistochemical profile showed an infiltrate dominated by T cells of polyclonal origin. In addition, polyclonal B cells and histiocytes were present in small numbers. In all 3 cases, oral antibacterial treatment resulted in a complete (2 patients) or temporary (1 patient) resolution of skin lesions.

Conclusions:  Palpable migratory arciform erythema shows distinctive differences in clinical and pathological features and treatment in contrast to other diseases with cutaneous lymphocytic infiltrates, including lymphocytic infiltration of Jessner and Kanof. Therefore, it is likely a distinct disease entity.Arch Dermatol. 1997;133:763-766

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