[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.205.176.107. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
November 1997

A CONTRIBUTION TO THE ETIOLOGY OF CONGENITAL ICHTHYOSIS—REPORT OF CASE WITH ABSENCE OF THYROIDWITH MICROSCOPIC REPORT OF THE CONDITION OF THE SKIN

Author Affiliations

Brooklyn, N. Y.

Arch Dermatol. 1997;133(11):1348. doi:10.1001/archderm.1997.03890470018002
Abstract

THE scarcity of reports of ichthyosis congenita, with postmortem and microscopic findings, have led me to present the following:

The mother has been pregnant seven times. The first and second children were born at term, and are still living and healthy. The third pregnancy resulted in miscarriage at the sixth month. Fourth, a boy, at full term, died when about a year old of some infantile disease. The fifth labor took place at about the eighth month; the result was the ichthyotic infant reported by Dr. Sherwell before this Association in 1894.

A year later she again became pregnant. Child was born at term, a perfectly formed boy, the skin normal in all respects. On account of some injury during instrumental delivery, the infant survived only a few minutes after birth. Six months later she became pregnant for the seventh time, and was delivered at term of another ichthyotic monster, the subject of this report.

During the first, second, third, fourth, and sixth pregnancies the mother's condition was excellent, she being neither nervous nor sick. The fifth, which resulted in the first ichthyotic infant, she was subjected to considerable anxiety, and at the sixth month received a severe nervous shock. When she became pregnant for the last time she immediately grew exceedingly nervous and worried lest she should become the mother of another deformed baby.

Regarding maternal impressions. It is not the purpose of this paper to attempt to say whether the mental and nervous shock had any bearing on the production of these monsters; still, it is a curious and interesting fact that three healthy and normal pregnancies were followed by perfectly formed children, while the two attended with worry, fright, and shock produced ichthyotic babies.

J Cutan Genito-Urin Dis.

November 1897;15:516-520.

×