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This Month in Archives of Dermatology
February 2002

This Month in Archives of Dermatology

Arch Dermatol. 2002;138(2):165. doi:10.1001/archderm.138.2.165
Skin Colonization by Malassezia Species in Neonates: A Prospective Study and Relationship With Neonatal Cephalic Pustulosis

Malassezia species have been implicated as the pathogens in several superficial dermatologic conditions, including tinea versicolor and seborrheic dermatitis. Occasionally, Malassezia has also been implicated in more invasive disease, particularly in neonates. Bernier et al demonstrate the rapid progressive colonization of neonates by Malassezia species and note the association with cephalic pustulosis (neonatal acne).

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Herbal Therapy in Dermatology

Herbal therapy is becoming increasingly commonly used by patients and dermatologists alike. Bedi and Shenefelt offer an excellent overview of the efficacy, safety profile, and drug interactions of many of the plant-derived therapies that our patients are using on a regular basis.

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Comparative In Vitro Pediculicidal Efficacy of Treatments in a Resistant Head Lice Population in the United States

Head lice infestation is an increasing problem among school-aged children in the United States and around the world. Treatment failure is also being observed with increasing frequency. Meinking et al compare the efficacy of several commercially available pediculicides, revealing that many have become less effective over time, with the exception of 0.5% malathion.

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Follicular Mucinosis: A Critical Reappraisal of Clinicopathologic Features and Association With Mycosis Fungoides and Sézary Syndrome

Follicular mucinosis may occur in many diverse settings, notably in mycosis fungoides or Sézary syndrome. A number of histologic criteria have been proposed to differentiate benign idiopathic follicular mucinosis from the mycosis fungoides–associated cases. Cerroni et al find these criteria ineffective in this retrospective survey and suggest that idiopathic follicular mucinosis may actually represent a localized form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

Lymphoma-associated follicular mucinosis in patient 29. Patches, plaques, and flat tumors appear on the face and neck.

Lymphoma-associated follicular mucinosis in patient 29. Patches, plaques, and flat tumors appear on the face and neck.

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Familial Confluent and Reticulated Papillomatosis

The pathophysiology of confluent and reticulated papillomatosis remains unknown. Although cases of familial confluent and reticulated papillomatosis have been reported, they have shed little light on the cause of this disorder. İnalöz et al are the first to examine the ultrastructural and immunohistochemical studies in such familial cases. They suggest that abnormal keratinocyte differentiation may play an etiologic role in these cases.

Confluent and reticulated papillomatosis involving 2 brothers.

Confluent and reticulated papillomatosis involving 2 brothers.

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