[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.163.166.22. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Citations 0
This Month in Archives of Dermatology
July 2004

This Month in Archives of Dermatology

Author Affiliations
 

ROBIN L.TRAVERSMD

Arch Dermatol. 2004;140(7):785. doi:10.1001/archderm.140.7.785
Effect of a 1-Week Treatment With 0.5% Topical Fluorouracil on Occurrence of Actinic Keratosis After Cryosurgery

Treatment of actinic keratoses (AKs) is recommended because of the potential of these lesions to evolve into invasive squamous cell carcinoma. Therapeuticoptions include chemical destruction, such as with 5-fluorouracil, or physical destruction, such as with cryosurgery, curettage, or electrosurgery. In thisprospective, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, vehicle-controlled clinical trial, Jorizzo et al demonstrate that pretreatment with a 1-week course of0.5% fluorouracil before cryosurgery significantly reduced the proportion of patients with AKs at 6 months following therapy compared with patientsreceiving cryosurgery alone. This serial treatment may reduce the need for long-term retreatment for AKs.

See Article

Effects of a Superpotent Melanotropic Peptide in Combination With Solar UV Radiation on Tanning of the Skin in Human Volunteers

The melanocortins are a family of peptide hormones that induce pigmentation by interaction with melanocortin 1 receptors in the epidermis. α-Melanocytestimulating hormone (α-MSH) is the primary pigmentary hormone in the skin. Using a superpotent derivative of α-MSH, melanotan-1 (MT-1), Dorret al examine whether MT-1 could be safely combined with small amounts of UV-B from a solar stimulator and demonstrate a marked enhancement of skintanning. Thus, MT-1 in combination with minimal sun exposure should provide the cosmetic benefits of a tan without the need for substantial solar exposureand its inherent risks.

See Article

Thalidomide Treatment for Prurigo Nodularis in Human Immunodeficiency Virus–Infected Subjects: Efficacy and Risk of Neuropathy

Prurigo nodularis (PN) is a chronic, intensely itchy condition characterized clinically by discrete hyperkeratotic nodules primarily on the extensor surfacesof the extremities. Standard therapies, such as antihistamines, UV phototherapy, and topical and systemic corticosteroids, may prove ineffective or problematicin human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–seropositive patients. Thalidomide has been used to treat refractory PN in non–HIV-infected subjects, andin this prospective study, Maurer et al demonstrate its safety and efficacy in treating PN in HIV-seropositive patients. The significant number of patientswho developed treatment-associated peripheral neuropathy in this setting emphasizes the need for careful neurologic assessment during the course of therapy.

See Article

Poor Prognosis of Arthritis-Associated Pyoderma Gangrenosum

Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is an idiopathic, rare, destructive, necrotizing skin disease characterized by noninfectious ulcers that most commonly affectthe lower extremities. Approximately 50% of patients with PG have an associated systemic disease, including various types of arthritis. In this retrospectivereview, Charles et al compare a series of patients with lower extremity ulcers of PG confined to the skin with patients with PG associated with arthritis(PGA). The ulcers of patients with PGA appeared to be more refractory to treatment than the ulcers of patients with PG alone.

See Article

Response of Ulcerated Perineal Hemangiomas of Infancy to Becaplermin Gel, a Recombinant Human Platelet-Derived Growth Factor

Infantile hemangiomas are the most common benign tumor of childhood, and ulcerations are the most common complication. Such ulcerations representa therapeutic challenge for which no single treatment has been demonstrated to be uniformly effective. Becaplermin gel is a recombinant human platelet-derivedgrowth factor-BB gel that is currently approved in the United States for the treatment of lower extremity diabetic neuropathic ulcers. Becaplermin gelhas also been reported useful in treating pressure ulcers. In this open study on 8 patients with ulcerated perineal hemangiomas of infancy, Metz et al demonstratethe safety and efficacy of of this medication for this painful complication.

A, Ulcerated hemangioma worsening in patient 1 despite wound care and intralesional steroids. B, Lesion appearance 19 days after starting treatmentwith 0.01% becaplermin gel.

A, Ulcerated hemangioma worsening in patient 1 despite wound care and intralesional steroids. B, Lesion appearance 19 days after starting treatmentwith 0.01% becaplermin gel.

See Article

×