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Surgical Technique
July 2003

The Use of Preserved Autogenous Septal Cartilage in "Touch-up" Rhinoplasty

Author Affiliations

From the Division of Facial Plastic Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery (Drs Wong and Giammanco), the Department of Biomedical Engineering (Dr Wong), and The Beckman Laser Institute (Dr Wong), University of California, Irvine; and the Newport Coast Center for Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Newport Beach, Calif (Dr Giammanco).

 

From the Division of Facial Plastic Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery (Drs Wong and Giammanco), the Department of Biomedical Engineering (Dr Wong), and The Beckman Laser Institute (Dr Wong), University of California, Irvine; and the Newport Coast Center for Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Newport Beach, Calif (Dr Giammanco).

Arch Facial Plast Surg. 2003;5(4):349-353. doi:10.1001/archfaci.5.4.349
Abstract

The management of minor contour irregularities after primary aesthetic rhinoplasty often requires correction of soft tissue defects with autogenous cartilage, allograft materials, xenograft matrix, or alloplasts. Inasmuch as the use of native cartilage requires an additional procedure (and potential donor site morbidity) and alloplast insertion raises the specter of extrusion or cicatrical deformity, the use of preserved autogenous cartilage is an attractive alternative, particularly for minor revision surgery. This study describes the experience and technique of the senior author (P.F.G.) with the use of isopropyl alcohol-preserved autogenous nasal cartilage during revision rhinoplasty in which only minor contour correction is required. When grafts are needed for revision surgery, they are inserted via small intranasal stab incisions into minor irregularities of the tip, alae, and dorsum. This technique eliminates the need for additional surgery to obtain graft material, reduces costs and risks associated with alloplasts, and is particularly useful for minor revision rhinoplasty. Office-based techniques for preserving cartilage are reviewed.

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