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Surgical Technique
January 2004

Reconstruction of Complex Scalp DefectsThe "Banana Peel" Revisited

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, Pa (Dr Frodel). Dr Ahlstrom is in private practice, Spokane, Wash.

 

From the Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, Pa (Dr Frodel). Dr Ahlstrom is in private practice, Spokane, Wash.

Arch Facial Plast Surg. 2004;6(1):54-60. doi:10.1001/archfaci.6.1.54
Abstract

Objective  To demonstrate the use of multiple, large, local flaps in the reconstruction of large scalp defects.

Methods  A retrospective review of 4 cases in which the "banana peel" method of scalp reconstruction, originally described by Orticochea, was used as a method for closure of moderately large to extensive scalp defects.

Results  In all 4 cases, closure of the scalp defects was accomplished. Major morbidity included hair-bearing skin in the forehead in 1 patient, an inconsequential small flap dehiscence requiring closure in the same patient, and a partial loss of a small skin graft to a donor site defect in 1 patient.

Conclusions  While other techniques may be optimal for the management of most scalp defects, such as 1- to 2-flap rotation-advancement flaps in small to moderate-size defects and microvascular free tissue transfer and secondary tissue expansion for larger defects, we conclude that the multiple-flap reconstruction method as described by Orticochea may be useful in a small subset of patients. The latter includes older, severely debilitated patients who would be optimally treated with microvascular tissue transfer but cannot tolerate lengthy general anesthesia and young patients who will not accept a significant area of alopecia that might exist with other techniques, such as secondary intention, skin grafts, or free flaps.

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