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Brief Communication
January 2004

Informed Consent for RhytidectomyA Survey of AAFPRS Fellowship Programs

Author Affiliations

Philadelphia
Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery
Thomas Jefferson University
925 Chestnut St, Sixth Floor
Philadelphia, PA 19107
(e-mail: Edmund.Pribitkin@mail.tju.edu)

 

Philadelphia


 

Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery
 Thomas Jefferson University
 925 Chestnut St, Sixth Floor
 Philadelphia, PA 19107
 (e-mail: Edmund.Pribitkin@mail.tju.edu)


Arch Facial Plast Surg. 2004;6(1):61. doi:10.1001/archfaci.6.1.61

Insurance industry data indicate that "failure to inform" is one of the most common secondary claims in malpractice lawsuits.1 Although a simple form cannot fully reflect the understanding between surgeon and patient, a thorough documentation of the inherent risks and benefits of a procedure can protect both the surgeon's and patient's best interests. Controversy exists as to which risks should be discussed with patients undergoing rhytidectomy. We sought to explore the practice of informed consent for rhytidectomy at each of the American Academy of Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS) fellowship programs. Subsequently, a composite informed consent for rhytidectomy was developed based upon a review of complications noted in the medical literature.2-4

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