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Beauty
January 2004

Lost Beauty and the Fountain of Youth

Author Affiliations

Department of Otolaryngology–Head & Neck Surgery
Director of Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery
Beth Israel Medical Center
10 Union Sq E, Suite 4J
New York, NY 10003
(e-mail: Mzimbler@bethisraelny.org)

 

Department of Otolaryngology–Head & Neck Surgery
 Director of Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery
 Beth Israel Medical Center
 10 Union Sq E, Suite 4J
 New York, NY 10003
 (e-mail: Mzimbler@bethisraelny.org)


Arch Facial Plast Surg. 2004;6(1):72. doi:10.1001/archfaci.6.1.72

Since the beginning of time humans have marveled at the unique properties of water. Myths of eternal life and tales of a restorative spring with magical healing powers can be traced through ancient folklore. In every religion and culture we find ties, whether symbolic or ritualistic, to this primordial element. Around 400 BC, a tale is told of a river in India with the powers to heal, restore sexual potency, and cure blindness. The Egyptians believed that one of the Babylonian gods of water was also a great physician, and that waters from the Tigris River had medicinal properties.

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