[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.197.171.35. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Citations 0
Surgical Technique
September 2004

The "Pinch and Slide" BlepharoplastySafe and Predictable Aesthetic Results

Author Affiliations

From the Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY (Dr Zimbler); and Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Illinois at Chicago (Dr Thomas). Dr Prendiville is in private practice in Naples, Fla.

 

From the Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY (Dr Zimbler); and Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Illinois at Chicago (Dr Thomas). Dr Prendiville is in private practice in Naples, Fla.

Arch Facial Plast Surg. 2004;6(5):348-350. doi:10.1001/archfaci.6.5.348
Abstract

Blepharoplasty is one of the most common facial cosmetic surgical procedures. When done properly, this relatively simple operation can result in a dramatic improvement for the patient with relatively little downtime. However, when it is performed improperly, the results can be crippling for the patient and often difficult for the surgeon to correct. Standard treatments for upper eyelid dermatochalasis include surgical excision of skin, muscle, and fat. Several techniques have been described for removing some or all of these components, depending on the patients' anatomic requirements. In particular, the "pinch" technique can be used to remove either the upper eyelid skin alone or a combination of skin, muscle, and fat. While this technique is not new, its appearance in the literature is sparse. We demonstrate herein how a modified version of the pinch technique can be used to remove the central orbital fat pad by "sliding" the pad through the medial fat pad incision. This procedure maintains the integrity of the central orbital septum and the delicate structures that lie beneath.

×