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Commentary
May 2005

Modulation of Wound Response With Growth Factors and Platelet Concentrate

Author Affiliations

Correspondence: Dr Koch, Wound Healing and Tissue Engineering Laboratory, Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology–@Head and Neck Surgery, 801 Welch Rd, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305-5739 (RJK@Stanford.edu).

Arch Facial Plast Surg. 2005;7(3):170-171. doi:10.1001/archfaci.7.3.170

Correspondence: Dr Koch, Wound Healing and Tissue Engineering Laboratory, Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology–@Head and Neck Surgery, 801 Welch Rd, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305-5739 (RJK@Stanford.edu).

Efforts to modify the wound-healing process have led to renewed interest in growth factors in plastic surgery. By manipulating the local wound environment, it may be possible to improve the wound-healing process as desired for different clinical states.1 This interest has spawned a generation of several commercially available systems that use autologous proteins. For background, the major growth factors that have a direct effect on the growth of fibroblasts (the main effector cell in wound healing) are fibroblast growth factor, transforming growth factor β, and platelet-derived growth factor. The major growth factors that have an angiogenic effect are vascular endothelial growth factor and cysteine-rich protein 61.2 Cysteine-rich protein 61, which is a heparin-binding, extracellular matrix–associated protein, is a signaling molecule with functions in cell migration, adhesion, and proliferation.

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