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Commentary
November 2005

Technical Advances in Nasal Surgery

Author Affiliations

Correspondence: Dr Davis, Division of Facial Plastic Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology, University of Miami School of Medicine, 1475 NW 12th Ave, UMHC Suite 4035 (D-1), Miami, FL 33136 (rdavis@med.miami.edu).

Arch Facial Plast Surg. 2005;7(6):413. doi:10.1001/archfaci.7.6.413

Correspondence: Dr Davis, Division of Facial Plastic Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology, University of Miami School of Medicine, 1475 NW 12th Ave, UMHC Suite 4035 (D-1), Miami, FL 33136 (rdavis@med.miami.edu).

Technology continues to transform the practice of medicine, and nasal surgery is no exception. In this issue of the Archives, Dr Raynor1 reports on the successful treatment of 29 patients with symptomatic septal deformities using a power-driven endoscopic microdebrider. The powered microdebrider not only provides a less invasive surgical approach, it also offers the advantages of improved visualization, precise cartilage resection, and few surgical complications. Although this technology will no doubt gain immediate popularity among rhinologic surgeons (many of whom are already using microdebriders for turbinate reduction, nasal polypectomy, and sinus osteotomies), the procedure may prove less appealing to the rhinoplasty surgeon, who frequently needs undamaged septal cartilage for use in augmentation grafting. Moreover, the typical cosmetic surgeon may not have ready or convenient access to the microdebrider or associated endoscopic visualization equipment. Nevertheless, for select patients with mucosal contact headaches, osteomeatal complex obstruction, or symptomatic nasal airway obstruction due to isolated septal spurs; this new technology offers a safe, effective, and less invasive alternative to conventional septal surgery.

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