Surgical Technique
March 2006

Initial Management of Total Nasal Septectomy Defects Using Resorbable Plating

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Departments of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery (Drs Della Santina and Byrne) and Biomedical Engineering (Dr Della Santina), Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md.

Correspondence: Patrick J. Byrne, MD, Department of Otolaryngology–@Head and Neck Surgery, Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 601 N Caroline St, JHOC Sixth Floor, Baltimore, MD 21287 (


Copyright 2006 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.2006

Arch Facial Plast Surg. 2006;8(2):128-138. doi:10.1001/archfaci.8.2.128

Temporary reconstruction of the nasal skeleton using resorbable plating offers several advantages in management of carefully selected patients undergoing septectomy. These include protection against early soft tissue contracture, lack of interference with postoperative radiation and surveillance imaging, ease of use, and reversibility. This strategy can yield a good functional result and acceptable cosmesis during radiotherapy and a period of surveillance prior to definitive reconstruction. Herein, we describe the use of resorbable plating material for temporary nasal support in staged reconstruction of complex nasal skeletal defects. We managed near-total defects of the nasal cartilaginous and bony skeleton after cancer resection by staged reconstruction, initially using resorbable plating material to provide temporary structural support for nasal soft tissue during a 1-year period of postresection surveillance. The resorbable reconstruction provided adequate support to maintain nasal patency and external contour for a year or more, allowing early return to normal activities. Partial extrusion occurred in a patient who continued heavy smoking.