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Surgical Technique
May 2006

Treatment of Deep Orbital Hemangiomas of InfancyAn Overview

Author Affiliations
 

Author Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Oculoplastic and Orbital Surgery, Rocky Mountain Lions Eye Institute, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver.

Correspondence: Vikram D. Durairaj, MD, Department of Ophthalmology, Oculoplastic and Orbital Surgery, Rocky Mountain Lions Eye Institute, 1675 N Ursula St, Campus Box F-731, PO Box 6510, Aurora, CO 80045-0510 (vikram.durairaj@uchsc.edu).

Arch Facial Plast Surg. 2006;8(3):217-220. doi:10.1001/archfaci.8.3.217

Correspondence: Vikram D. Durairaj, MD, Department of Ophthalmology, Oculoplastic and Orbital Surgery, Rocky Mountain Lions Eye Institute, 1675 N Ursula St, Campus Box F-731, PO Box 6510, Aurora, CO 80045-0510 (vikram.durairaj@uchsc.edu).

Hemangiomas are the most common benign tumors of infancy and the most common tumors of the orbit and eyelid in childhood. In one series, hemangiomas accounted for 1% of all biopsy specimens of orbital lesions in all age groups and 4% of all biopsy specimens of orbital lesions in children.1-2 Ophthalmic terminology often referred to periorbital hemangiomas as capillary hemangiomas; however, current medical literature classifies hemangiomas as superficial, deep, and compound. For periorbital tumors, superficial hemangiomas are anterior to the orbital septum, deep hemangiomas are posterior to the orbital septum and often cause a mass effect, and compound hemangiomas have both a deep and a superficial component. This article reviews the treatment of pediatric deep orbital hemangiomas.

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