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In This Issue of JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery
Mar/Apr 2013

In This Issue of JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery

JAMA Facial Plast Surg. 2013;15(2):75. doi:10.1001/jamafacial.2013.249

Randall A. Bly, MD, and colleagues report their experience with computer-guided repair of orbital fractures. They used surgical navigation and mirror-image overlays of the uninjured orbit to guide reduction of orbital fractures and placement of orbital implants and compared postoperative outcomes with patients in whom these techniques were not used. The study is one of the largest to investigate the use of surgical navigation and mirror-image overlay technology in the repair of orbital fractures and highlights the power of surgical endoscopy when operating in the orbit. The value of the technique is emphasized in fractures involving 3 or 4 walls, and the shortcomings in cases of bilateral orbital injuries and facial asymmetry are discussed.

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Judy W. Lee, MD, and Shan R. Baker, MD, describe a technique using septal bone grafts to repair caudal septal deviations. A retrospective review of 81 patients was performed in which septal bone grafts were used to maintain the caudal septum in a midline position. The authors describe their technique in details and discuss the indications for its use and the various techniques available to correct caudal septal deviations.

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Andrew A. Jacono, MD, and Evan R. Ransom, MD, performed a retrospective study of 157 patients undergoing midface rejuvenation to identify predictors of patients' dissatisfaction. Variables such as procedure, physical examination findings, and patient characteristics were included. The authors identify multiple preoperative characteristics that may be used to predict the possibility of patient dissatisfaction and provide an algorithm to be used for the midface cosmetic consultation.

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Abel-Jan Tasman, MD, and colleagues provide long-term follow-up in patients in whom diced cartilage molded in fibrin glue was used for dorsal augmentation. The authors report the long-term satisfaction and complications associated with the grafts as well as the amount of resorption that occurs over time using ultrasonography. As a result of revision cases, the authors were able to show histologic results of biopsied grafts with evidence of cartilage regeneration. The characteristics ofthe ideal graft fordorsal augmentation are discussed in addition to the advantages and disadvantages of the authors' technique.

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Violette Heymann by Odilon Redon, 1840-1916.

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