[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.87.119.171. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Download PDF
Figure.
Histological Appearance of a Poly-L-Lactic Acid (PLLA)-Related Nodule
Histological Appearance of a Poly-L-Lactic Acid (PLLA)-Related Nodule

Multinucleated giant cells with unhydrated birefringent PLLA crystals (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnification × 20).

1.
Olivier Masveyraud  F.  Rajeunissement facial par l’acide L-polylactique: à propos de 298 cas consécutifs. Ann Chir Plast Esthet. 2011;56(2):120-127.
PubMedArticle
2.
Apikian  M, Roberts  S, Goodman  GJ.  Adverse reactions to polylactic acid injections in the periorbital area. J Cosmet Dermatol. 2007;6(2):95-101.
PubMedArticle
3.
Valantin  MA, Aubron-Olivier  C, Ghosn  J,  et al.  Polylactic acid implants (New-Fill) to correct facial lipoatrophy in HIV-infected patients: results of the open-label study VEGA. AIDS. 2003;17(17):2471-2477.
PubMedArticle
4.
Narins  RS.  Minimizing adverse events associated with poly-L-lactic acid injection. Dermatol Surg. 2008;34(s1)(suppl 1):S100-S104.
PubMedArticle
5.
Beljaards  RC, de Roos  KP, Bruins  FG.  NewFill for skin augmentation: a new filler or failure? Dermatol Surg. 2005;31(7, pt 1):772-776.
PubMedArticle
Views 652
Citations 0
Research Letter
Nov/Dec 2014

Role of Massage in Preventing Formation of Papules and Nodules After Injecting Poly-L-Lactic Acid

Author Affiliations
  • 1Janjua Facial Surgery, Bedminster, New Jersey
JAMA Facial Plast Surg. 2014;16(6):457. doi:10.1001/jamafacial.2014.1173

To the Editor Poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) (Sculptra; Sanofi-Aventis) is a biostimulator that has been associated with complications of papule and nodule formation. A prospective study was performed with 91 immunocompetent patients, who provided written informed consent.

Methods

PLLA was prepared at least 24 hours before the injection with 6 mL of bacteriostatic water. Immediately prior to injecting, 4 mL of 2% plain lidocaine was added to make a total of 10 mL. There was only 1 injector (T.A.J.). The plane of injection was the deep dermis, close to the junction with subcutaneous tissues. Patients were given written instructions for postprocedure care and discharged. They were contacted by telephone several times over the next year, and data were recorded.

Results

Of the 62 patients who chose to massage, 27 (42%) developed papules or nodules (lumps) (Figure). Of the 29 patients who chose not to massage, 8 (28%) developed lumps. A 2-sample proportion summary of the data does not show statistical significance (P = .14). The total incidence of lumps in our study was 38.5%. The onset of lumps was as early as 2 days to as late as 10 months after the injection. The most common location for the lumps was the chin near the prejowl sulci. Patients were asked if they noticed any improvement in the skin quality; 38.5% responded a definitive “yes” and 22% responded with “maybe.” Fifty-nine patients (65%) indicated that they would be willing to be treated with PLLA again. Interestingly 54% of the patients who had developed lumps also would be willing to be treated with PLLA again.

Discussion

The initial results of PLLA have been remarkable, with satisfaction rates of more than 90%.1 However, there was a high incidence of papule and nodule formation in the early studies. The incidence rate has been reported to be as high as 100% in the infraorbital area.2 Other studies have shown the overall incidence of nodules to be 3.7%1 to 44%.3 The nodules can last for longer than 2 years despite the use of corticosteroid injections.2,4 The periorbital nodules have been seen to appear as late as 3 years after the injection.2 Some of the treatments include the use of topical imaquimod,4,5 0.5% fluorouracil cream injections, intense pulsed light, doxycycline, and saline injections with mechanical breakdown of the nodule into smaller pieces.4 As a last resort, surgical excision has been used with success.5 The high incidence of adverse effects led clinicians to make changes in their techniques of constituting the medication, injecting and after care.4 Through the retrospective studies it has been shown that the incidence of papules and nodules decreased after implementation of these changes.1 However, papules and nodules have not been eliminated. Given this shortfall of PLLA, it is imperative to continue the quest for a perfect PLLA that will not lead to any papules and nodules. The role of massage after PLLA injections is unclear.

Back to top
Article Information

Corresponding Author: Tanveer A. Janjua, MD, Janjua Facial Surgery, 2345 Lamington Rd, Ste 108, Bedminster, NJ 07921 (tjanjua@drtjanjua.com).

Published Online: November 6, 2014. doi:10.1001/jamafacial.2014.1173.

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: Dr Janjua was a paid physician trainer for Sculptra (Sanofi-Aventis) in 2010 and 2011 and is presently on the physician trainer panel of Sculptra (Valeant Pharmaceuticals).

References
1.
Olivier Masveyraud  F.  Rajeunissement facial par l’acide L-polylactique: à propos de 298 cas consécutifs. Ann Chir Plast Esthet. 2011;56(2):120-127.
PubMedArticle
2.
Apikian  M, Roberts  S, Goodman  GJ.  Adverse reactions to polylactic acid injections in the periorbital area. J Cosmet Dermatol. 2007;6(2):95-101.
PubMedArticle
3.
Valantin  MA, Aubron-Olivier  C, Ghosn  J,  et al.  Polylactic acid implants (New-Fill) to correct facial lipoatrophy in HIV-infected patients: results of the open-label study VEGA. AIDS. 2003;17(17):2471-2477.
PubMedArticle
4.
Narins  RS.  Minimizing adverse events associated with poly-L-lactic acid injection. Dermatol Surg. 2008;34(s1)(suppl 1):S100-S104.
PubMedArticle
5.
Beljaards  RC, de Roos  KP, Bruins  FG.  NewFill for skin augmentation: a new filler or failure? Dermatol Surg. 2005;31(7, pt 1):772-776.
PubMedArticle
×