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Invited Commentary
June 11, 2012

Routine Periodic Stress Testing in Asymptomatic Patients Following Coronary Revascularization: Is It Worth the Effort?Comment on “Exercise Testing in Asymptomatic Patients After Revascularization”

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Divisions of Cardiology and Clinical Epidemiology, Jewish General Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, and Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Arch Intern Med. 2012;172(11):861-863. doi:10.1001/archinternmed.2012.1910

The confluence of increasing budgetary restrictions and the proliferation of medical imaging make the appropriateness of routine periodic stress testing in asymptomatic patients following coronary revascularization a hotly debated topic.1,2 Routine periodic stress testing is still used by many physicians. Putative reasons include surveillance for restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), identification of graft patency after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, and determination of completeness of revascularization. However, the usefulness of routine periodic stress testing in asymptomatic patients following coronary revascularization remains unknown.

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