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Article
November 1919

A GROUP OF SIXTY-EIGHT CASES OF TYPE I PNEUMONIA OCCURRING IN THIRTY DAYS AT CAMP UPTONWITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO SERUM TREATMENT

Author Affiliations

Major, M. C., U. S. Army, Chief of Medical Service, Base Hospital; First Lieutenant, M. C., U. S. Army, Assistant in the Medical Service, Base Hospital; CAMP UPTON, N. Y.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1919;24(5):545-552. doi:10.1001/archinte.1919.00090280076008

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Abstract

From February 10, to March 12, 1919, 135 cases of pneumonia were admitted to the Base Hospital; of this number, 50 per cent., or sixty-eight cases, were diagnosed bacteriologically as having type I pneumococcus the predominating organism in their infection.

This small epidemic was practically confined to colored troops, only four out of the sixty-eight cases affecting white men. These troops embarked from Brest, sailing to New York, and were then transferred to Camp Upton for demobilization.

On entering the hospital they presented the picture of acute lobar pneumonia. The classical signs were present in all, and only differed in the intensity of their symptoms. Starting with a chill — pain in the affected side, grunting respiration, with dilating alae nasi completed the picture, of this type of disease. The early sputum was blood streaked; later it became prune juice in color. Dulness over the affected area became an early

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