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Editor's Correspondence
Aug 13/27, 2012

Do Angiotensin Receptor Blockers Really Hold Promise for the Improvement of Cognitive Functioning?

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Department of Psychopharmacology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore, India (Dr Andrade); and Department of Psychiatry, Creighton University School of Medicine, Omaha, Nebraska (Dr Fernandes).

Arch Intern Med. 2012;172(15):1191-1192. doi:10.1001/archinternmed.2012.2091

In a small (n = 53), 12-month, randomized controlled trial, Hajjar et al1 found that elderly hypertensive subjects with impaired executive functioning showed greater executive improvements with candesartan (an angiotensin receptor blocker [ARB]) therapy than with lisinopril or hydrochlorothiazide. They concluded that cognitive protection may arise through selectivity of angiotensin receptor blockade with ARBs.

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