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Editorial
November 11, 2013

Are There Sex Differences in Acute Coronary Syndrome Presentation?A Guide Through the Maze

Author Affiliations
  • 1Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
  • 2Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
JAMA Intern Med. 2013;173(20):1861-1862. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.8075

In 1772, Heberden first reported his personal experience of angina pectoris as a retrosternal pain characterized by a crushing, burning, or squeezing sensation.1 Decades of later work by a host of other scientists uncovered angina as a cardinal manifestation of myocardial ischemia, although the biology underlying the manifestation of angina remains poorly understood.2 Perception of anginal symptoms is an important survival mechanism in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), alerting the need for urgent medical care.

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