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Comment & Response
May 2014

Will a Policy of Refusing Reimbursement for Health Care–Associated Infections Be a Sufficient Incentive to Drive Improvements?

Author Affiliations
  • 1Twin Peaks Group LLC, Lexington, Massachusetts
  • 2Department of Anesthesiology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee
  • 3Department of Surgery, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee
  • 4Department of Biomedical Informatics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee
  • 5Department of Psychiatry, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth, New Hampshire
  • 6Department of Community and Family Medicine, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth, New Hampshire
JAMA Intern Med. 2014;174(5):823. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2014.39

To the Editor In a recently published article1 that used a meta-analysis to estimate costs of health care–associated infections (HCAIs), the conclusion, which was reinforced in the accompanying Editor’s Note,2 suggested that, in light of a newly imposed Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services policy wherein treatment for such infections will no longer be reimbursed, awareness of the high costs of these infections—estimated to be almost $10 billion per year—would lead hospitals to invest in appropriate improvement programs.

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