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August 2014

Evidence-Based Evaluation for Allergies to Avoid Inappropriate Testing, Diagnosis, and Treatment

Author Affiliations
  • 1Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, Houston
  • 2Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Copyright 2014 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.

JAMA Intern Med. 2014;174(8):1223-1224. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2014.1413

In the midst of an examination room cluttered with crayons, coloring books, and toys intended to pacify or bribe children during allergy skin testing, an anxious mother attended to her active 4-year-old son. A glance at the appointment book before walking into the room indicated that the reason for this new patient visit was “food allergies.” The interview began with the usual “why are you here” question. The mother’s response: she wanted to know what foods her son was really allergic to and were causing his hyperactivity (attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder [ADHD]).

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