[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.161.216.242. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Views 1,211
Citations 0
Invited Commentary
September 2014

Clinical Trials and the Right to Remain Silent

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Health Policy and Management, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts
  • 2Harvard Law School, Boston, Massachusetts
JAMA Intern Med. 2014;174(9):1505-1506. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2014.2341

In this issue of JAMA Internal Medicine, Kernan et al1 chronicle Yale University’s experience responding to a subpoena for data from an ongoing, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of pioglitazone. The subpoena arose from litigation brought by Sara J. Kincaid,2 who believed she had been injured by pioglitazone but who was not a clinical trial participant. Yale’s legal team was troubled because they believed that releasing the data would compromise the integrity of the trial and threaten the investigators’ scientific interests.

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×