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Comment & Response
August 2014

Real-World Evidence About Potential Psychosocial Harms of Lung Cancer Screening

Author Affiliations
  • 1The Pulmonary Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts
  • 2Center for Healthcare Organization & Implementation Research, Edith Nourse Rogers Memorial Veterans Hospital, Bedford, Massachusetts
  • 3Health Services Research & Development, Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, Oregon
  • 4Division of Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland
JAMA Intern Med. 2014;174(8):1416. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2014.1643

To the Editor We applaud Harris and colleagues1 for their clearly organized taxonomy of potential harms associated with low-dose computed tomographic screening for lung cancer, which includes “psychological harms” as 1 of 4 categories. The authors point out that patients undergoing surveillance for a screening-detected indeterminate nodule are exposed to a prolonged state of uncertainty but comment that there is limited evidence about the associated psychological harms.

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