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Editor's Correspondence
October 28, 2002

A Stitch in Fact Saves None

Author Affiliations

Copyright 2002 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.2002

Arch Intern Med. 2002;162(19):2253-2254. doi:

In their recent review article, Drs Raad and Hanna1 provide a useful and informative overview of some recent advances in understanding and preventing catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs). However, they neglect to cite a recently indicted culprit in the causal sequence leading to CRBSIs—namely, suture. The results of 2 randomized, prospective clinical trials2,3 established that replacement of suture, for securement of both short and long central venous catheters, with a sterile adhesive anchor device (StatLock; Venetec International, San Diego, Calif) dramatically decreases CRBSIs. Crnich and Maki,4 in a summary analysis of these studies, showed that only 1 of 144 patients with central venous catheters experienced CRBSI in the adhesive anchor cohort, compared with 13 of 135 patients in the suture group (P<.01). Moreover, in both studies, suturing physicians sustained accidental needlesticks at the rate of 2%, compared with 0% in the adhesive anchor group.

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