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Invited Commentary
June 2015

Caring for the Adult Survivor of Hodgkin LymphomaHighlighting the Need for Care Coordination

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York
  • 2Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Aurora
JAMA Intern Med. 2015;175(6):1017-1018. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2015.1187

There are currently more than 13 million individuals with a history of cancer living in the United States.1 Of these, an estimated 400 000 are adult survivors of childhood cancer2; with ongoing progress in cancer treatment and supportive care, that estimate is expected to increase. Cardiovascular events, including coronary heart disease (CHD), cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure (HF), and valvular heart disease, are the leading noncancer causes of morbidity and mortality in this population.3 Furthermore, we know that few adult survivors of childhood cancer return to their cancer center for adult care,4 and care for older adult cancer survivors is often fragmented, such that care for these medically complex patients is typically in the hands of primary care physicians who treat adults.

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