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December 2015

Treating Influenza With Neuraminidase InhibitorsWhat Is the Evidence?

Author Affiliations
  • 1Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco
  • 2Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, San Francisco VA Health Care System, University of California, San Francisco
JAMA Intern Med. 2015;175(12):1899-1900. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2015.5747

The approaching influenza season will likely bring renewed debate about the usefulness of the neuraminidase inhibitors, a class of antiviral drugs approved for the chemoprophylaxis and treatment of influenza. The available approved formulations include oral oseltamivir (Tamiflu; Roche Pharmaceuticals), inhaled zanamivir (Relenza; GlaxoSmithKline), and intravenous peramivir (Rapivab; BioCryst Pharmaceuticals). All 3 drugs are perceived to have comparable efficacy, although because of its ease of administration, oseltamivir has been the best studied and is the most aggressively marketed and prescribed neuraminidase inhibitor in the United States and worldwide.

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