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Comment & Response
February 2016

Spiritual Care Providers and Goals-of-Care Discussions—Reply

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • 2The Trent Center for Bioethics, Humanities, and History of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina
  • 3The Duke Divinity School, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina
JAMA Intern Med. 2016;176(2):279. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2015.7893

In Reply We thank Drs Barot and Yu for their comments regarding the complex factors contributing to goals-of-care conversations. They are correct that in our study1 we were not able to quantify discussions hospital chaplains may have had with families outside of conferences that included clinicians. The primary observation remains that clinicians rarely discussed spiritual concerns with families of critically ill patients, even when families seemed to raise such concerns.

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