Research Letter
May 2016

Validation of the Instant Blood Pressure Smartphone App

Author Affiliations
  • 1Division of General Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • 2Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, Division of Cardiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • 3Department of Chemistry, Pomona College, Claremont, California
  • 4Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, Clinical Research, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland

Copyright 2016 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.

JAMA Intern Med. 2016;176(5):700-702. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.0157

Mobile health (mHealth) technologies include unregulated consumer smartphone apps.1 The Instant Blood Pressure app (IBP; AuraLife) estimates blood pressure (BP) using a technique in which the top edge of the smartphone is placed on the left side of the chest while the individual places his or her right index finger over the smartphone’s camera. Between its release on June 5, 2014, and removal on July 30, 2015 (421 days), the IBP app spent 156 days as one of the top 50 best-selling iPhone apps; at least 950 copies of this $4.99 app were sold on each of those days.2 Validation of this popular app or any of the similar iPhone apps still available (eg, Blood Pressure Pocket, Quick Blood Pressure Measure and Monitor), have not been performed. Using a protocol based on national guidelines,3 we investigated the accuracy and precision of IBP.

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