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Research Letter
July 2016

Medication Sharing, Storage, and Disposal Practices for Opioid Medications Among US Adults

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland
  • 2Center for Mental Health and Addiction Policy Research, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland
  • 3Department of Health, Behavior, and Society, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland
  • 4Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland
  • 5Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland
JAMA Intern Med. 2016;176(7):1027-1029. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.2543

The prescription opioid epidemic continues with few signs of abatement.1 Most adolescents and adults reporting recent nonmedical use of opioid medications obtain these medications through their family or friends.2 Minimal research has examined knowledge and practices related to opioid medication sharing, storage, and disposal among US adults who recently received prescriptions for these medications despite this group serving as a source for individuals using opioid medications for nonmedical purposes. We conducted a national survey among US adults with recent opioid medication use to examine the pervasiveness of sharing opioid medications, medication storage and disposal practices, and the sources of information received.

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