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Article
February 1919

THE CAUSE OF THE REACTIONS FOLLOWING TRANSFUSION OF CITRATED BLOOD

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Medical Clinic of the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital and the Laboratory of Physiology of Harvard Medical School.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1919;23(2):133-149. doi:10.1001/archinte.1919.00090190003001
Abstract

In analyzing the reactions following blood transfusion by any of the different methods now in vogue, all figures should be based on cases in which donor and recipient have been properly matched prior to the operation. By means of the methods for grouping and direct matching given us by Moss1 and others it is possible to exclude a certain number of gross hemolytic reactions which used to be inevitable. It is also a very simple matter to list a number of Group 4 donors, and with this done no emergency transfusion need ever become a completely reckless venture. In our experience it would appear possible to use carefully classified Group 4 donors for all cases, relying on the fact that the high dilution to which the incompatible plasma is brought nullifies its toxic effect. While this statement is in agreement with the views of Lee,2 it is interesting to find

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