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March 1919

THE RELATIVE FREQUENCY IN RECRUITS WITH AND WITHOUT THYROID ENLARGEMENT OF CERTAIN SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS WHICH OCCUR IN NEUROCIRCULATORY ASTHENIA

Author Affiliations

Captain, M. C., U. S. Army; Base Hospital; Captain, M. C., U. S. Army; Chief of Medical Service, Base Hospital CAMP LEWIS, AMERICAN LAKE, WASH.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1919;23(3):316-333. doi:10.1001/archinte.1919.00090200049005
Abstract

SECTION 1.—OBJECT OF THE INVESTIGATION  A considerable number of soldiers under training have been referred to the Cardiovascular Board on account of the presence of a syndrome which included all or most of the following signs and symptoms. The signs were increased pulse rate, tremor of the fingers and cold, moist hands which became cyanosed when dependent. The symptoms were precordial pain with dyspnea and palpitation on moderate exertion, such indications of vasomotor instability as dizziness, flushing and fainting, and a variety of other complaints, all pointing to a state of excessive reaction of the nervous system to psychic or physical strain.It was the impression of the board that thyroid enlargement was almost constantly found in men with this syndrome. This fact raised the question as to the relationship between the thyroid anomaly and the development of these signs and symptoms. It was clear that they were not cases

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