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Article
July 1919

THE IRRITABLE HEART IN GENERAL PRACTICEA COMPARISON BETWEEN IT AND THE IRRITABLE HEART OF SOLDIERS

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1919;24(1):51-64. doi:10.1001/archinte.1919.00090240054003
Abstract

During the last year or two medical literature abounds with various descriptions of the soldier's and recruit's heart. Indeed, so much has been written that with but a superficial knowledge or interest in cardiology, the impression is gained that a new and distinct entity characteristic of warfare had been discovered, and that it is never, or only extremely rarely, observed in civil life. This impression is heightened by the fact that similar conditions in civil life have scarcely been alluded to in the numerous reports, and that new and more or less confusing names have been given to this complex. To mention a few: The soldier's heart; effort syndrome; neurocirculatory asthenia; neurocirculatory myasthenia; disordered heart action and hyperthyroidism. From the broader viewpoint of clinical medicine, and as a result of an intensive study of the condition in cardiologic practice for many years, the examination of hundreds of candidates before the

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