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September 1919

AN EXPERIMENTAL ENDOTHELIAL LEUKOCYTOSIS IN GUINEA-PIGSFIFTH REPORT OF STUDIES ON THE MONONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTES OF THE BLOOD

Author Affiliations

MILWAUKEE

From the Department of Pathology, Marquette Medical School.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1919;24(3):295-301. doi:10.1001/archinte.1919.00090260050004
Abstract

In laboratory animals there may be produced a neutrophilic leukocytosis by infectious agents such as the pyogenic cocci, or by chemical substances such as croton oil. A less striking increase of the eosinophils has been produced by extracts of certain parasitic worms. Aside from the diagnostic significance of variations in the number of leukocytes in human blood, there are indications that the reaction of cells present there is a factor in the resistance to the infection. The development of a method1 for the identification of endothelial leukocytes made it possible not only to determine the percentage of these cells present normally in the blood of experimental animals, but also to test the effect on the endothelial leukocyte count of bacterial and animal proteins and of chemical compounds. The guinea-pig was chosen for the experiments largely on account of its freedom from natural infections of a chronic nature. Blood is best

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