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Article
January 1920

THE CEREBROSPINAL FLUID IN MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE

From the Department of Medicine and the Henry Phipps Psychiatric Clinic, Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1920;25(1):58-62. doi:10.1001/archinte.1920.00090300063004
Abstract

Since the introduction of the colloidal gold test of Lange,1 numerous reports have appeared in the literature of examinations of the cerebrospinal fluid of large numbers of patients with neurologic diseases of all types.

Characteristic results have been obtained only in neurosyphilis, and the findings of the various types of this disease are now well known. However, the so-called "paretic" gold curve, at first supposed to be pathognomonic of general paralysis, at least within the group of syphilitic disorders, has been obtained in a number of other conditions, among which are lead poisoning, tuberculous meningitis, brain tumor and multiple sclerosis. In the first three of these conditions the curve has not appeared with any regularity, but in the last named it seems to be more than an occasional finding. For this reason, it has been thought worth while to survey the material from this clinic and review the literature, with

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